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by e-mail, it is completely wrong. the u.s. postal service is not the victim of e-mail and text messages. it is the victim of alec and the koch brothers. why, you ask? quite simple, really. the usps is the number one employer of unionized labor in the united states and provides an affordable universal service that a private company could and would charge us all much, much more for. two huge no-nos for the right wing. the reason the right wing crafted the legislation to destroy the postal service. we're joined now by nationally and internationally syndicated radio host the brilliant thom hartmann who wrote an incredible piece about this very subject for truth out.org called the usps media hashtag fail. >> great to be with you. >> john: please complain what the postal accountability enhancement act is and what its effects have been. >> well, you know, there were some reasonable and some good changes in that act which is -- as far as i can tell, how it got out of the house government oversight committee henry waxman and other democrats basically signing of on it. it was passed by a
political contributor the democratic strategist hilary rosen and the former u.s. senator from minnesota and former romney foreign policy adviser norm coleman. guys, thanks very much for coming in. the speaker just met with reporters on the hill. i'll play a little clip. this was his message. >> listen, hope springs eternal. the president can sit down with harry reid tonight and work with senate democrats who have the majority in the senate to move a bill. it's time for them to act. i've made this clear for months now. and yet we've seen nothing. >> now, he wants them, senator, to move legislation that passed in the last congress. the last congress is irrelevant right now. you need new legislation in order to pass a bill. >> wolf, what's not irrelevant is last congress we had the tax increase. so now it's spending cut time. the president doesn't want to to the spending cut. we had the tax increase -- >> right now, to avert this fiscal crisis we have right now, these forced spending cuts, you need a new bill. you can't use a bill from the old congress. >> the president -- you know what, a
'm heather childers. topping the news, new fallout on the benghazi attack. leon panetta saying that the u.s. military could not respond like a police department. >> this is not 911. you can't simply call and expect within two minutes to have a team in place. >> heather: is this a preview of what we could see when he testifies before the senate? a fair and balanced debate straight ahead. >> gregg: and the death of an american hero. he struck fear into the hearts of our enemies and now we have the tragic ending of chris kyle a sniper without equal in military history. >> heather: plus, reports that the american dream have may have been premature. kids believe that their tomorrow will be better than our today. >>> we begin with a fox news alert. a town in mourning as we awaited details on the alabama hostage crisis. the funeral for the bus driver gunned down by jimmy lee dikes. he has been hiding out in an underground bunker with a five-year-old hostage. jonathan, what happened at the funeral today? >> reporter: the funeral procession was led by the patriot guard riders and also a convoy of sc
cancelled across the country, and here at the three major airports in new jersey and new york, many of the u.s. airlines decided to cut off departures by 5:00 tomorrow and not to resume until after noon tomorrow, and if we did go inside earlier today and there are no lines. there are no lines for checkin there are no lines for security, and the reason is, when we check the board, the monitors for departures and arrives, everything was cancelled. most everything was cancelled. we found some people waiting in here. one guy from france said his flight was cancelled. tonight he has to wait until tomorrow to get a flight and doesn't know what he is going do he has to try to get a hotel to, otherwise he is staying here. we did find some people that had a flight at 6:30. their airline called them and changed the flight to earlier. so they were supposed to get oust here at 5:00 so they're hoping they wail be able to do that before at the brunt of the storm hits, get out of here and get to their destination safely. but it is just a ghost town here. it appears that a lot of the airlines did call people
. speaker, this is no time to eliminate preclearance. i'm reminded of a letter i wrote to the u.s. attorney's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-autho
mondale, democrat of minnesota. mr. mondale entered the u.s. senate at the beginning of our national war on poverty under lbj. senator mondale outlasted president johnson in office, but he kept working on that basic idea, of using public policy to help out the least well off among us. by 1971 he succeeded in getting passed with big bipartisan support a bill that would have created a daycare system essentially in this country. universal preschool for american kids. the tuition was on a sliding scale so everybody could afford it. senator mondale got his bill passed and it went to the guy who was president by then. it went to richard nixon. and richard nixon vetoed it even though it passed with lots of republican votes. president nixon said the idea of preschool for everyone had quote, family-weakening implications. he said quote, the child development envisioned in this legislation would be truly a long leap into the dark for the united states government and the american people. a long leap into the dark. 40 years after president nixon said no to preschool for all american kids with the we
and the former general counsel of the u.s. chamber of commerce and the network of major donors who were invested in this idea that the establishment that maybe more moderate candidates are the future and the best hope of the republican party in 2014. that whole web of people is really putting a lot on the line with this new project. it's rove, but it's the people around rove, as well. >> here's another thing. how surprising is it to see karl rove get back in the game so soon after the whooping that he took? >> i'm sure he would make the case that despite the dismal results on election day that his group prevented it from getting worse. >> really? is that the argument? >> that is what, you know, people will say when you spend a lot of money and you come up short is that without that spending you would have done even worse, but the problem is it's very difficult to pinpoint which parts of the campaign architecture and infrastructure tend to help. it's difficult to get those metrics. >> yeah. >> politico's alexander burns. thank you, gentlemen. we have a whole lot to get to in our next hour. the st
committee examined u.s. airways and american airlines' merger. that coverage is at 10:00 a.m.. a house committee judiciary subcommittee on regulatory reform will be looking into this murder and its impact on competition. here is a full-page ad taken out by american airlines in the washington post -- they are claiming that it will bring consumers more choice. a full-page ad in the washington post ahead of today's hearing. writing in the opinion section of the wall street journal, bob corker, republican of tennessee, a ranking republican on the foreign relations committee, and jim inhofe writing together, nuclear zero offers nothing worth having. they're talking about the president's plan to reduce the u.s. nuclear -- nuclear arsenal. in "the new york times" -- talks with iran to take place in iran -- in moscow. secretary of state john kerry, promising fresh ideas on syria. those are some of the morning headlines for you. we're continuing to talk to federal employees only. we have about five minutes. robin in maryland, she works for dod. tell us your take? caller: good morning. i'm calli
dempsey testify about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed ambassador christopher stevens and others. we will be live with the armed services committee starting at 10:00 a.m. on c-span. later, john brennan, the cia director joyce, testifying before the senate committee. he is expected to face questions on the cia drone program. we will be live with this program starting at 2:30 p.m. eastern also on c-span. >> if you go to most american history textbooks, if you go to the back of the textbooks you have in the basement, you can take me up on my bet. my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, you'll find no mention of eugenics. if you go to your biology books, you will find no mention of the word "eugenics. a biology books signed by most of the places, montana university, great textbooks, but i did not see any mention of eugenics. that is because we, scientists, no longer believe in eugenics, so we do not have to study it anymore. it was so awful that we can somehow pretend it is not part of american culture. >> part of lect
in iraq but was hailed as perhaps the deadliest sniper in u.s. military history, was shot and killed on saturday by a troubled fellow soldier, a man he was trying to help. nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski joins us with the latest on this. what are police and witnesses saying happened here and where things went so wrong for chris kyle? >> well, police in texas have one suspect in custody. eddie ray routh, a marine corps reservist, 25 years old, who apparently, according to reports, was suffering from ptsd. now, chris kyle and other veterans there in texas would often try to independently help those with ptsd by taking them to shooting ranges to sort of blow off steam. now, according to officials in texas, this was the first time that kyle and his friend had met eddie ray routh at this shooting range about 50 miles outside ft. worth on saturday, when suddenly and allegedly, routh opened fire with a hand gun at point-blank range allegedly again killing both kyle and the other former service member. now, routh is in jail, he's expected to be charged with two counts
a little research. you look at u.s. military spending from 1988 to 2011, and it has gone up in a big way. you look at the percentage of the u.s. military spending compared to the rest of the world. it is, you know, in the last 20 years, we've seen record spending on defense. now, that is due in some part to the fact that we had a war in iraq. we have ongoing military engagement in afghanistan. that costs money, but where do you think democrats need to be. >> on this issue of sequester? >> where democrats have to be is in intelligent reduction in defense spending. the sequester is not intelligent reduction. one of the benefits, i think, of chuck hagel as secretary of defense is he does know and i think will have the willingness to go in there and find the places that are real fat. find the weapons systems that don't work. find the pad in the things, find the excessive spending on things that we don't need, and cut those rather than cutting troop deployments or things like that. >> i think that argument is valid up to a point. the same thing you can say about domestic spending. there's a c
: it appears the questions on brennan go directly to the u.s. policy on drones. we had rand paul on yesterday, the senator from kentucky. he is adamant that he will not allow brennan to go forward unless he answers a simple question. and that is, whether or not it is u.s. policy and u.s. law to use a drone over american skies and target americans here at home. what is your view on that? >> well, bottom line, i think senator paul has every right to have his questions answered. you're putting someone in a position in the cia that obviously is going to be making decisions that affect everyday americans not only here but abroad. he has that right to have those questions answered. we need to have a full disclosure from the administration as to what the policy is going to be. listen, i don't have a problem when somebody leaves their citizenship at the door and they're overseas and they have taken up arms against the united states of america. and they clearly are trying to hurt americans not only here but abroad, to use drones. i've been public on that already. the question comes what about here in
a class on u.s. defense budgeting. at georgetown, we do care about these issues and we share your concerns, as well. in the defense budget of 2013, i understand 19% of the budget is being represented for personnel. about 26% is for procurement. 40% is for operations. if you look at all the different accounts for which the budget is requested, and the sequestration cuts across the board will affect seriously to the manpower, the modernization, and the leadership of the military. i have reviewed a lot of documents of the defense budget for many years in the past. i do not see a way how we can cut the defense budget. i do not see a way how sequestration will occur and not affect these three crucial defense-related areas. now, knowing that only around 4% of the gdp is being constituted by the base defense budget, and a bulk of the gdp -- >> we agree on your fax. what is the question? [laughter] >> right. this is a puzzle to me. my question is, this is really a puzzle. [laughter] how can you balance the budget without either cutting the defense budget or the mandatory account, medicare, medicai
soldier, was the head of the u.s.o., served on the senate floor relations committee. he is imminently qualified to be secretary of defense. and the notion that we would see an unprecedented filibuster, just about unprecedented. we've never had a secretary of defense filibustered before. there's nothing in the constitution that says that somebody should get 60 votes. the republican minority in the senate seemed to think that the rule now is that you have to have 60 votes for everything. well, that's not the rule. the rule is that you're supposed to have a majority of the hundred senators vote on most bills. the filibuster historically has been used slektively for a handful of issues to extend debate. but we don't have a 60-vote rule. and, yet, that's become kmonl practice. this is just the latest example. it's just unfortunate that this kind of politics intrudes at a time when i'm still presiding over a war in afghanistan and i need a secretary of defense who is coordinating with our allies to make sure that our troops are getting the kind of strategy and mission that they deserve. >>
with. 14 years ago this week, bill clinton was acquitted by the u.s. senate on his impeachment trial. only one of they say congressman ever made it to the senate in those efforts. who was that congressman? lindsey graham. famous trying to humiliate democrats, trying to do the same thing now. stephanie: give him the vapors. >> lindsey graham is my favorite tennessee protagonist. stephanie: and here he is, doing his catherine help burn impression. >> this is showing a chip on one shoulder about israel, an unhealthy statement to say the least and i think patently false but unnerving to a guy like me. >> all right thanks. stephanie: pardon me? >> summer's eve could sell lindsey graham, he's like brick in cat on a hot tin roof. >> that's not the character i was thinking of. stephanie: the thing we're all wondering, what is jay think? >> people are trying to say that and blame me as being the bad guy causing a filibuster. that's not the case at all. stephanie: just when you think he reached the last level level douche baggery. he was saying there's nothing icky in their entire family tree
that the u.s. fails to collect from taxes its owed, it has to borrow money to pay for its spending. it's not only paying for the people that, you know, fail to pay their taxes but also paying investors' interest and that come back to the taxpayer in future years. i found a study that 140ed that should sec west trace go through and not be fix the and should the irs have to lay off a few thousand enforcement employees, it's probably going to cost the government $45 bill dollars and that because of future interest will translate to about $33 in-householdnot in the future for americans. >> bill: this is insane. isn't it? when you think about it? i mean the impact of it. so, when tom coburn or some other -- -- or john boehner, or some other republican legislateor says they are exaggerating this is not that bad. this is not really going to hurt, it's just wrong? >> i think it really compends upon where you are looking. i think when you look at the i felt rs, i think a lot of people, even republicans, will say that, you know, that's one area that you got to crack
investor's company berkshire t hathaway is buying heinz for $28 million. >>> u.s. airways moving toward forming the biggest airline. the $11 billion merger is subject to approval by federal regulato regulators. >>> and even celebrities have to go through security. an airline employee gave kim kardashian and kanye west v.i.p. treatment allowing them to bypass a check point in order to expedite their access to their flight. that flight was delayed an hour. the tsa is not blaming kim-ye for the breach. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. >>> sequester showdown right now on capitol hill, a senate hearing underway on the impact of the looming sequester. march 1st is the date am
, on tomorrow's show, former u.s. secretary of state madeline albright will join us onset. >> i thought we were going to have an awkward segue because andrew ross sorkin is over there. >> no, no. we're talking about madeline albright. there is andrew ross sorkin. he's coming up too. >>> coming up later this morning, former senior adviser to president obama, david axelrod. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ] [ siren wailing in distance ] you know you forgot to take your mask off, right? we should probably get out of here. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new beetle convertible. now every day is a top-down day. that's the power of german engineering. >>> all bundled up. that's good because it's cold outside. don't forget your mittens. >> you put that hat on. nobody put that hat on you. >> true. >> put it on. live with it. >> andrew ross sorkin is here. also, bob woodward when we come back. "morning joe" is going to start rocking. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain che
to beef up securities at u.s. embassies abroad. state has asked for $2.4 billion for immediate needs. iranian president is in egypt today becoming the first iranian president to visit the country since the islamic revolution in 1979. the two will attend the organization of it islamic cooperation, a summit beginning tomorrow. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth on. also in minis. [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's the "stephanie miller
, none made it to the u.s. who knew ikea sold meatballs? >> i did. i love ikea meatballs. mika's daughter when she goes horseback riding actually feeds them to the horse. >> stop it. you're sick. my daughter is never going to speak to you again. >> it's terrible. i don't think she ever has. >> is there a refrigerated section in ikea, where are the meatballs? >> do they come in parts? >> you have to assemble them. >> you put them on the shelf. >> at the horse stable. >> stop it, joe. >> there will be nay-sayers, wow! >> "politico." "politico." he's here. >> if you can't trust ikea meatballs, who can you trust? >> one more institution. our faith is shaken. >> our faith is shaken. >> horse meatballs at ikea. in the flesh in new york city, the editor-in-chief, they sent us the editor-in-chief. >> that's huge. >> take us through this fascinate i fascinating governorial race. the former chief, ken cuccinelli and the former chief, terry mcauliffe. >> it's what you talk about, the divide in the republican party. ken is really conservative and the guy elbowed aside, bill boeing says there's a 50-5
by 22, 23 points? >> well, north dakotans are notorious ticket splitters. first time i won for the u.s. house of representatives was 1980. ronald reagan carried north dakota in a huge landslide. so people were on the republican side of the ticket voting for ronald reagan, came back over in large part, voted for me. i won with 57% that year. north dakotans are ticket splitters. they take a look at the candidate much more so than the party. although i must admit only two presidential candidates, two democratic presidential candidates in 100 years have gotten the votes of north dakota. they traditionally vote republican for president. but other than that, they're very choosy and they want someone they can trust someone they like and heidi heitkamp ran a great campaign. she will be a terrific senator. >> bill: you have been out of the senate now for two years. among other things, you're writing novels. and you have another one coming out. you've been working with a bipartisan policy center, particularly on the energy issue. and releasing your recommendations yesterday. to the congress and
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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